Fish

All about fish, new species, new discoveries and all kind of interesting things about fish

Aquarium Industry

Everything about new equipment, breeders and other news about ornamental fish

Weird, Cool & Fun

Weird things about fish, fishkeepers, fish shops, shows and more.

From the wild

News from the wild, new species, things happening in fish habitats and more.

Zoo & Aquariums

What’s happening in Zoo’s and public aquariums, read the news here.

Home » Weird, Cool & Fun

Making art from stripped-down dead animals

Submitted by on May 4, 2013 – 10:44 amNo Comment |
Art from the remains of a Potamotrygon motoro (motoro stingray) and an Osteoglossum bicirrhosum (Silver arowana).

Art from the remains of a Potamotrygon motoro (motoro stingray) and an Osteoglossum bicirrhosum (Silver arowana).

“SOMETIMES I go to pet shops and ask whether I can receive dead creatures.”

And then 29-year-old Iori Tomita, from Yokohama, Japan, does incredible things to them. Taking up to a year, he gently rinses the animals with enzymes that break down soft tissue and protein. What is left is what he calls the transparent specimen: cartilage, which he dyes blue, and bone, dyed purple. “People are attracted by the beauty of creatures,” he says. “Formalin specimens look grotesque.”

Most of the material that Tomita uses in his art comes from fishermen – he used to be one until he was 25 – discarded dead crabs, squid, unsold deep-sea fish, unwanted tiddlers. And then there are the macabre packages from pet shops. Tomita still fishes, but his life changed when he visited an art gallery for the first time two years ago and realised that he could fuse his love of nature with what was regarded as art.

There is a moral dimension to the work, too. He quotes a UN Food and Agriculture Organization report showing that a third of all food produced for human consumption each year is wasted. “Do you think about how many lives that is?” he asks.

Tomita – who says he has thought about but rejected the idea of making transparent artworks of dead humans – sells prints and, in Japan, bottled specimens of stripped-down animals. There is also an iPad app called New World Transparent Specimens.

Source: New Scientist

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also Comments Feed via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.